Some garden stuff and a prayer request

No word on Amanda’s test results yet. She’s just resting and staying away from everyone else in the house. James (her fiance) is staying downstairs for the most part because of his health issues — 3 go-rounds of cancer in recent years, the chemotherapy ruined his liver and kidneys, and he also has a pacemaker because of it — so Amanda’s trying to keep him safe. James has an esophogeal/stomach scope appointment coming up August 18; he’s been vomiting for weeks and has lost a lot of weight. The doctors thought it was his gallbladder, but now they don’t know what’s going on. Please keep Amanda and James in prayer. These yellow gladioli I bought Elissa for her garden (because that’s her favorite color) just started blooming last week . . . The plants in the background will be large orange marigolds (left) and orange, red, and/or purple celosia (right) from my seed collections. The marigolds and celosia have been growing to 4-5 foot heights in recent years! Everything has taken so long this year to either bloom or produce. Even regional farmers have had trouble. So much heat in the 90s and 100s since the beginning of May has

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The ones who sew and quilt

I do a lot of sewing. My family would emphasize that to be   A   L O T   ! My mama taught me how to sew when I was nine years old. I don’t remember this part, but dad told me years later that she’d bought a child’s sewing machine for me. But after just a couple weeks, mama told him that I was way past child-size machine use and that she was going to teach me to use her Singer sewing machine. Using it only a couple weeks must be why I don’t remember that child’s sewing machine. I don’t have a photo of my mama’s Singer, but I know it was a 1948 and it came with a table. This photo is exactly like the machine and table she had. As far as I’m concerned, there has never been a better sewing machine than the old vintage Singers. I wish I still had her machine, but dad sold it a few years after mama died. Her mother – my grandma Dessenberger – had one of the original Singer treadle sewing machines. One time she opened it up for me to look at and I thought it was the coolest

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Rain, bowling alleys, a church, and a prayer request

Rain! Glorious rain! It started moving in Sunday night . . . Since yesterday morning we’ve had on and off showers and thunderstorms. Our area is in a flash flood watch through next weekend. We could possibly get 3-6 inches of rain by the time it’s all over. When I sent son, John, a text yesterday morning about it, he commented that he should probably get the lawn mowed before it started. I said, yeah, since some of the grass way out by the back fence was taller than his two year old son. 😆 So, I went over to watch Aero so he could get it mowed (Elissa was at work). We’re so thankful for this rain! As I was taking these photos, I thought about that big red-brick building you can see there on the left. It used to be Riverside Lanes Bowling Alley. It was one of the two local bowling alleys I would frequent with my friends during my high school years in 1973-1975. Riverside looked like this back in the day . . . Yeah, that photo is a little before my time spent there lol. It went out of business decades ago. Now it looks

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The day I knew more than the rest of the class

Back when I was in fifth grade (about 1967-68), our elementary school decided to start having the teachers switch between rooms each afternoon for the fifth and sixth grades; each teacher would focus on one subject for each classroom for about 30 minutes. Basically it was their idea of getting us ready for junior high and the hourly class changes we would have then. For our three fifth grade classes, Mrs. Wedel did vocal music, Mr. Hillyard taught history, and Miss Bowron was our Math teacher. (Interesting tidbit on Mrs. Wedel — I found out many years later while working on my Mennonite ancestry that she and I are cousins twice removed… and her family pronounced their last name “way·dul,” not “wee·dul” like most others with that surname.) One afternoon for history, Mr. Hillyard said we were just going to have an easy day and that we could set our history textbooks aside. He started by talking about the power of hearing and what it says about a person when they hear details others might not notice. He spent maybe a total of five minutes on that. Then, he quick-changed over to miscellaneous historical dates and things that happened. All

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Silly cards

I’ve always loved art. Specifically the kind where you put some type of drawing or painting implement in your hand. I’m talking crayons, watercolors, colored pencils, gel pens, acrylics, graphite . . . You get the picture. (Pun intended. 😉) From the moment my mama introduced me to crayons back when I was a toddler (no, I don’t actually remember that — she told me) I’ve been coloring, drawing, painting, doodling, scribbling, sketching, spattering, and just plain having a good ol’ time with making my own kind of drawn or painted art. My favorite implements in recent years are colored pencils and gel pens (as I said in this post). I thought I’d share some cards I made for Jerry in 2017 that I came across again the other day while re-organizing his dresser drawers. I’d drawn them during the few weeks when I was having trouble with the car AND winter weather kept happening — which made it so I could not get to the facility he was in at the time because it was in another town. Cellphone service in that tiny town was awful and their facility telephone connections were even worse. So, I drew silly little cards

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